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How dangerous can such viruses from the ground that once circulated before be for people today?

How dangerous can such viruses from the ground that once circulated before be for people today? The Hamburg virologist Schmidt-Chanasit is convinced that there is no greater danger from viruses. In order to make people sick, the viral load absorbed must be high. In addition, the infectiousness decreases over the years. The longer a virus-infected corpse or human remains lie under the ice, the less dangerous the pathogens are.

The long road to the new threat

Researchers have found viable viruses while drilling in the ice or in the permafrost soil. “But they were brought to life under laboratory conditions,” explains Schmidt-Chanasit. When the ice releases viruses in nature, they are immediately exposed to environmental influences and die quickly. For example, animals would have to come into direct contact with a thawed and infected carcass in order to be able to become infected.

Bacteria are more resistant – and therefore also more dangerous. “Anthrax spores are environmentally stable,” says Schmidt-Chanasit. They can persist for a long time in the frozen ground and later make animals and people sick again. Bacteria that cause anthrax – also known as anthrax – have already made entire herds of reindeer sick on the Yamal Peninsula. There have been repeated reports of reindeer deaths in recent years. Many animals are now vaccinated preventively. Only again this spring.

Two years ago, Russian biologists in Yakutia in northeast Siberia discovered layers of microorganisms that they estimated to be more than three million years old. According to the scientists, the biggest problem with thawing the permafrost is that long-frozen and present-day bacteria come into contact and exchange genetic material, as the Russian state agency Tass reported. Then it could happen that harmless microbes become dangerous pathogens.

Mild temperatures, new carriers

However, in the course of climate change viruses and bacteria are not only becoming a threat to health because of thawing ice and thawing soil. Ticks and mosquitoes, for example, are increasingly playing a role in our latitudes as carriers of infectious diseases that were previously restricted to southern climes. One reason for this is that introduced species get through the milder winters better.

In the south of France, people were infected with the Zika virus last year by tiger mosquitoes that had made their home there – it was the first such evidence in Europe. Another imported disease is causing outbreaks in Europe: the occasionally fatal West Nile fever. At the end of September 2019, the first case of a human infection acquired in Germany became known.

The disease, which originally came from Africa, was previously known as an animal disease, especially in birds. What is worrying is that the virus can be transmitted by normal domestic mosquitoes. Here, too, climate change plays a role: the warmer it is, the faster the pathogen in the mosquito multiplies, according to experts – the risk of transmission increases. The West Nile virus could therefore also cause seasonal waves of illness in Germany in the future.

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The

Corona crisis

has already illustrated the devastating effects of pandemics.https://123helpme.me/to-kill-a-mockingbird-essay/ Climate change could ensure that the situation continues to get worse. But what risk can lurk in soils that are increasingly thawing due to global warming?

The people in northeast Siberia believed that the dangerous bacteria had long been defeated. But then the permafrost thawed. A twelve year old died and more than 70 people were hospitalized. The cause was the anthrax, which terrorists have also used for attacks.

The explanation for the incidents on the Yamal Peninsula in 2016 causes concern: The boy is said to have ingested the pathogen through the meat of a sick reindeer. With rising temperatures, the bacterium was released from the soil and initially infected animals.

Igniting climate change

A risk cannot be dismissed out of hand. “The danger is quite real,” says the virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg. Bacteria themselves could have survived for centuries on carcasses that the ice has now released due to the rising temperatures.

The European Earth observation program Copernicus just reported that May was the warmest May on global average since records began in 1979. The highest values ​​were measured in parts of Siberia, where the temperature was up to ten degrees higher than the average for the years 1981 to 2010. In Alaska and the Antarctic it was also significantly warmer than the average.

The concern is that climate change could bring back diseases to mankind that seemed long since eradicated. For centuries people – including those who died of disease and epidemics – were buried in the permafrost of the Arctic. The current wave of corona infections shows what effects pandemics can have.

Diseases survive in the ice

In many places the permafrost is thawing layer by layer. According to experts, climate change has a much stronger impact in regions with permafrost, especially in Alaska, Canada and Siberia than in many other parts of the world. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), temperatures in permafrost, i.e. in permafrost soils, have risen to record levels in the past 40 years – after millions of years with temperatures like in a freezer.

More than ten years ago, researchers from the US National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases made a discovery on the coast of Alaska: One more indigenous woman was lying in a mass grave in a remote Inuit village near the town of Brevig Mission Buried under more than two meters of ice and dirt for 75 years, as scientists wrote. The permafrost and the fat reserves of the woman meant that the virus particles were well preserved in her lungs. So good that researchers were able to extract genetic information from it about the Spanish flu – the disease that brought a terrible pandemic to the world a good 100 years ago.

How dangerous can such viruses from the ground that once circulated before be for people today? The Hamburg virologist Schmidt-Chanasit is convinced that there is no greater danger from viruses. In order to make people sick, the viral load absorbed must be high. In addition, the infectiousness decreases over the years. The longer a virus-infected corpse or human remains lie under the ice, the less dangerous the pathogens are.

The long road to the new threat

Researchers have found viable viruses while drilling in the ice or in the permafrost soil. “But they were brought to life under laboratory conditions,” explains Schmidt-Chanasit. When the ice releases viruses in nature, they are immediately exposed to environmental influences and die quickly. For example, animals would have to come into direct contact with a thawed and infected carcass in order to be able to become infected.

Bacteria are more resistant – and therefore also more dangerous. “Anthrax spores are environmentally stable,” says Schmidt-Chanasit. They can persist for a long time in the frozen ground and later make animals and people sick again. Bacteria that cause anthrax – also known as anthrax – have already made entire herds of reindeer sick on the Yamal Peninsula. There have been repeated reports of reindeer deaths in recent years. Many animals are now vaccinated preventively. Only again this spring.

Two years ago, Russian biologists in Yakutia in northeast Siberia discovered layers of microorganisms that they estimated to be more than three million years old. According to the scientists, the biggest problem with thawing the permafrost is that long-frozen and present-day bacteria come into contact and exchange genetic material, as the Russian state agency Tass reported. Then it could happen that harmless microbes become dangerous pathogens.

Mild temperatures, new carriers

However, in the course of climate change, viruses and bacteria are not just a threat to health because of thawing ice and thawing soil. Ticks and mosquitoes, for example, are increasingly playing a role in our latitudes as carriers of infectious diseases that were previously limited to southern regions. One reason for this is that introduced species get through the milder winters better.

In the south of France, people were infected with the Zika virus last year by tiger mosquitoes that had made their home there – it was the first such evidence in Europe. Another imported disease is causing outbreaks in Europe: the occasionally fatal West Nile fever. At the end of September 2019, the first case of a human infection acquired in Germany became known.

The disease, which originally came from Africa, was previously known as an animal disease, especially in birds. What is worrying is that the virus can be transmitted by normal domestic mosquitoes. Here, too, climate change plays a role: the warmer it is, the faster the pathogen in the mosquito multiplies, according to experts – the risk of transmission increases. The West Nile virus could therefore also cause seasonal waves of illness in Germany in the future.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

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The

Corona crisis

has already illustrated the devastating effects of pandemics. Climate change could ensure that the situation continues to get worse. But what risk can lurk in soils that are increasingly thawing due to global warming?

The people in northeast Siberia believed that the dangerous bacteria had long been defeated. But then the permafrost thawed. A twelve year old died and more than 70 people were hospitalized. The cause was the anthrax, which terrorists have also used for attacks.

The explanation for the incidents on the Yamal Peninsula in 2016 causes concern: The boy is said to have ingested the pathogen through the meat of a sick reindeer. With rising temperatures, the bacterium was released from the soil and initially infected animals.

Igniting climate change

A risk cannot be dismissed out of hand. “The danger is quite real,” says the virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg. Bacteria themselves could have survived for centuries on carcasses that the ice has now released due to the rising temperatures.

The European Earth observation program Copernicus just reported that May was the warmest May on global average since records began in 1979. The highest values ​​were measured in parts of Siberia, where the temperature was up to ten degrees higher than the average for the years 1981 to 2010. In Alaska and the Antarctic it was also significantly warmer than the average.

The concern is that climate change could bring back diseases to mankind that seemed long since eradicated. For centuries people – including those who died of disease and epidemics – were buried in the permafrost of the Arctic. The current wave of corona infections shows what effects pandemics can have.

Diseases survive in the ice

In many places the permafrost is thawing layer by layer. According to experts, climate change has a much stronger impact in regions with permafrost, especially in Alaska, Canada and Siberia than in many other parts of the world. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), temperatures in permafrost, i.e. in permafrost soils, have risen to record levels in the past 40 years – after millions of years with temperatures like in a freezer.

More than ten years ago, researchers from the US National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases made a discovery on the coast of Alaska: One more indigenous woman was lying in a mass grave in a remote Inuit village near the town of Brevig Mission Buried under more than two meters of ice and dirt for 75 years, as scientists wrote. The permafrost and the fat reserves of the woman meant that the virus particles were well preserved in her lungs. So good that researchers were able to extract genetic information from it about the Spanish flu – the disease that brought a terrible pandemic to the world a good 100 years ago.

How dangerous can such viruses from the ground, which once circulated, be for people today? The Hamburg virologist Schmidt-Chanasit is convinced that there is no greater danger from viruses. In order to make people sick, the viral load absorbed must be high. In addition, the infectiousness decreases over the years. The longer a virus-infected corpse or human remains lie under the ice, the less dangerous the pathogens are.

The long road to the new threat

Researchers have found viable viruses while drilling in the ice or in the permafrost soil. “But they were brought to life under laboratory conditions,” explains Schmidt-Chanasit. When the ice releases viruses in nature, they are immediately exposed to environmental influences and die quickly. For example, animals would have to come into direct contact with a thawed and infected carcass in order to be able to become infected.

Bacteria are more resistant – and therefore also more dangerous. “Anthrax spores are environmentally stable,” says Schmidt-Chanasit. They can persist for a long time in the frozen ground and later make animals and people sick again.